Oxycodone Detox Program

OXYCODONE OVERVIEW

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There are many, many mind-altering substances that have proven to be problematic on a societal level. Of course, we often associate substances like alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine with problematic intoxicants, but many of the most dangerous substances are ones that are synthetic and man-made, created in a lab to be helpful rather than harmful. A prime example exists in the various pharmaceuticals that exist. In fact, we’ve only recently seen a decline in the abuse of and addiction to pharmaceutical drugs after over a decade of high rates of prescription drug addiction. However, even though rates of prescription drug abuse are down, substances like oxycodone remain a nuisance today. But what, exactly, is oxycodone? Where did it come from and what are its effects? And how do you overcome oxycodone addiction?

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WHAT EXACTLY IS OXYCODONE?

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Before discussing oxycodone, it’s necessary to look back on the development of opiate drugs as a whole as well as of opium in particular. According to records, opium — the powerful narcotic obtained from the seeds of the opium poppy — has been used by humans for approximately seven thousand years or perhaps even longer. Having originated in the Mediterranean area, opium use was had several key uses, including as a painkiller during primitive surgical procedures, for spiritual practices and ‘enlightenment’, and even recreationally. Over time, these uses of opium spread through many other populations in the Mediterranean, North African, Eastern European, and Western Asian areas, but it wasn’t until opium made its way to China that it began cementing its place in human history.
In China, opium quickly became a hot commodity. It didn’t take long for the Chinese to develop a major opium addiction problem with so-called ‘opium dens’ emerging throughout the region. Sure enough, Chinese emigrants brought opium to the United States as they traveled westward, often spurred by the availability of jobs and other opportunities. Once it reached the U.S., opium became a problem for Americans, too. As in China, many opium dens appeared throughout North America, prompting research into alternative versions of opium that had similar therapeutic benefits without the addictive potential or side effects. This led to the discovery that the active ingredients in opium were two main alkaloids: codeine and morphine.

Morphine became a major commodity in the U.S., particularly for its medicinal and surgical uses. In fact, morphine was instrumental in treating wounded soldiers throughout the American Civil War; however, morphine still had addictive properties, so additional research sought to find alternatives to the addictive drug. In fact, it was experimentation with morphine that would eventually lead to the development of heroin in Germany. Following heroin’s creation, it was initially marketed and sold as a cough suppressant until finally being made illegal in the early 1900s. Although heroin was quite effective, it was even more powerful and addictive than morphine, so researchers returned to the search for a newer and safer opiate. The result of this search was the creation of oxycodone in 1916.
Oxycodone was first developed in Germany during World War I as part of the search for morphine-like substances that didn’t have such high potential for abuse and addiction. However, like other opiates, oxycodone binds to the opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, which is how the drug is able to achieve its pain-killing properties. Percodan — a combination of oxycodone and aspirin — was released in 1950 and quickly became one of the most-prescribed pharmaceutical drugs. By 1963, it was discovered that Percodan accounted for more than one-third of all drug addiction in the state of California, eventually leading to the classification of oxycodone as a Schedule II drug in 1970. However, it was the release of OxyContin — an extremely potential form of oxycodone — in 1996 that would trigger the greatest opiate addiction epidemic ever seen; the effects of the OxyContin are still felt today in the form of the heroin epidemic.

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EFFECTS OF OXYCODONE

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As a painkiller, oxycodone has many of the same effects of other opiates. When taken at high doses, individuals feel a ‘rush’ that’s comparable to that of heroin; however, unless the oxycodone is taken intravenously, the onset is much less abrupt. More often than not, oxycodone pills are crushed into powder and insufflated (inhaled through the nose) due to the euphoria that uses experience from oxycodone’s abuse. Part of this euphoria is the feeling of warmth and fuzziness or tingling throughout the body. As well, oxycodone intoxication induces drowsiness and gives a person the impression that his or her arms and legs are quite heavy. Of course, there are side effects, too. Some of the most common side effects include itching, intense relaxation, feeling little to no physical pain (making individuals prone to self-injury), constipation, dry mouth, nausea, mood changes, headaches, and a number of other effects.

OXYCODONE DETOX AND WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS

After taking oxycodone frequently for an extended period of time, an individual will begin to experience unpleasant effects when unable to obtain or imbibe oxycodone. These effects are known as symptoms of withdrawal. The most characteristic symptoms of oxycodone withdrawal include insomnia, sweating, yawning, watery eyes, cramps, nausea, diarrhea and/or vomiting, increased heart rate and blood pressure, restlessness, anxiety, agitation, physical pain in joints and muscles, and a number of other flu-like symptoms.

OVERCOMING OXYCODONE ADDICTION

Being addicted to oxycodone can be quite scary. A person may not know what he or she is willing to do to obtain the next fix. However, there are plenty of recovery resources available. Typically, overcoming oxycodone addiction begins with an initial detox period, which allows the addict to overcome the physical aspects of the addiction before beginning treatment so that he or she isn’t still experiencing withdrawal symptoms while in treatment. Once detoxing is complete, he or she can move into the treatment phase, which consists of individual counseling, group therapy, relapse prevention education, life skills training, and various other components. The goal is to address each of an addict’s unique recovery needs, giving him or her optimal chances of achieving a successful, long-lasting recovery from oxycodone addiction.

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Real Client Testimonials

  • Before coming to coastal I was hopeless, helpless, and my family wanted nothing to do with me. It wasn’t the first detox I’d ever been to, but it was the only one who showed me so much love and compassion. They gave me hope. It’s hard to put into words the amount of gratitude I have for this facility. The employees were my family when I had none. The staff went out of their way to make sure not only were my physical needs taken care of, but my emotional needs as well. From the first phone call prior to admission, to helping me set up continuing care, they never missed a beat. Even going as far as to help me with my legal issues via Zoom court. This isn’t just a detox, they are the family I never had. All of the techs, especially Karen, are phenomenal. They will take the time to listen to you, laugh, and cry(if needed) with you. If you are reading this and you or your loved one is suffering like I was, go to Coastal Detox. The level of care is more than I could ever put into a review. It wasn’t the first detox I’d been to, but it has been my last; I owe them everything I have today, including my life.

    Travis B Avatar
    Travis B.
    12/07/2020
  • Had a really good experience at Coastal. The staff really went above and beyond in helping me get in and gave me the respect l, space and care I needed after I first got there. As I started to fell better they encouraged me to take part in groups which helped get me out of my head and bring positivity and health to my thinking. They had a great massage therapist, who came daily and it was evident the nursing staff genuinely cared. Got to know some of the staff as well and I’m grateful for the cooks Joe and Chris. Those guys literally made us sirloins and pork chops for dinner. Also I gotta thank Chris and Chris for helping me get in and setting me up with a transition plan. Real grateful for that help, I’m not sure if it’s management intention to hire guys named Chris but they got a good thing going there. Overall, I’m clean and sober today and walking it out. Coastal gave me a base that set me up for the success that I’m walking in today

    Brandon B. Avatar
    Brandon B.
    1/16/2020
  • My family is very thankful for Coastal Detox. They have went above and beyond for my son a few times. Unfortunately he has needed their help more than once and they have ever turned their back on him, even when he was at his worst. Jeannie and Chris have been amazing and kept me informed through the entire process. They truly care about the addict and want to help them especially when it would be easy to give up on them. I had many detox facilities be rude and uncaring to me when I was searching for help for my son, but Coastal never did that to us. I don't know the names of all the team members that have helped my son but I know their are many and y'all are angels!! One day we will be able to pay it forward and help someone as you have helped us. Thank you for all you do!!

    Brenda A. Avatar
    Brenda A.
    1/01/2020
  • Can not say enough nice things about Coastal Detox & staff. Family member was there, told me five stars for the facility & all whom she interacted with. Said the facilities, ambience..., cleanliness, grounds, food, (think their chef is five stars), were all top shelf. All I interacted with personally & on the phone were patient, professional, responsive & caring. Kudos to so many: Jeannie Jones, Clinical Director whom I spent the most face to face time with: great oversight, patience & follow thru. Raquel Barker, Therapist was so understanding & on spot with her assessments/care. Kris Garrigus Admissions Director, another Coastal professional whom I cannot say enough nice things about, always so patient & responsive to my probably too frequent inquires. Not to be forgotten is Judy Tucker, Director of Operations she too so patiently "put up with me"
    I highly recommend Coastal Detox

    Susan C. Avatar
    Susan C.
    11/13/2019
  • Can not say enough nice things about Coastal Detox & staff. Family member was there, told me five stars for the facility & all whom she interacted with. Said the facilities, ambience..., cleanliness, grounds, food, (think their chef is five stars), were all top shelf. All I interacted with personally & on the phone were patient, professional, responsive & caring. Kudos to so many: Jeannie Jones, Clinical Director whom I spent the most face to face time with: great oversight, patience & follow thru. Raquel Barker, Therapist was so understanding & on spot with her assessments/care. Kris Garrigus Admissions Director, another Coastal professional whom I cannot say enough nice things about, always so patient & responsive to my probably too frequent inquires. Not to be forgotten is Judy Tucker, Director of Operations she too so patiently "put up with me"
    I highly recommend Coastal Detox

    Susan C. Avatar
    Susan C.
    11/06/2019

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