Marijuana Detox Program

MARIJUANA OVERVIEW

marijuana detox centers

Depressants are surely some of the most well-known and widely-used mind-altering substances. This specific class of drugs includes such substances as alcohol, benzodiazepines, and heroin to name just a few. However, there are few depressants that have become as ubiquitous as marijuana, which also happens to be one of the most controversial of all drugs, depressant or otherwise.

Since marijuana remains a key component of today’s substance use culture and a topic of debate for citizens, law enforcement, and public officials alike, it’s important to have an understanding of the drug’s background. In particular, what is marijuana? Where does it come from? How did it become so widely used? Why is it so controversial? What are the drug’s actual effects? And, perhaps most importantly, is marijuana addictive?

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WHAT IS MARIJUANA, EXACTLY?

Although it may seem like a relatively modern nuisance, cannabis use actually dates back several thousands of years. Over the course of our long history with this plant, it’s been used to achieve euphoria, for spiritual journeys, as a form of therapy, and even in textile production. However, many of the earliest writings — found in China before spreading throughout the rest of Asia and Europe — describe cannabis as a medicinal treatment.

The first time cannabis was referred to as a psychoactive agent was in the writings of Chinese emperor Shen Nung in 2737 BCE. According to Shen Nung, cannabis has a number of powers and applications, including as a medication for malaria, gout, rheumatism, and even for things like absentmindedness. Of course, Shen Nung also mentioned the plant’s intoxicating powers, but due to it having many medicinal applications, the intoxicating properties of the plan weren’t considered a deal-breaker.

Meanwhile, those living in India used cannabis almost purely for recreational purposes. The Muslims, too, also used cannabis recreationally since the Koran prevented them from being able to drink alcohol. In fact, it was Muslims who first began producing hashish — which was essentially a concentrated form of the psychoactive ingredients that cannabis contains — and who would eventually introduce it to those living in Iran, North Africa, and, eventually, the rest of the world.

Marijuana was brought to the Americas by the Spanish in 1545; however, it was the English who introduced marijuana to American natives at Jamestown in 1611, at which point it became a major commercial crop (in addition to tobacco) since it could also be harvested as a source of fiber. By the late-nineteenth century, cotton has taken the place of hemp — a cannabis by-product — as the predominant cash crop in the American South. Meanwhile, marijuana was being used less and less for its psychoactive properties; previously, some of the psychoactive elements in marijuana were used in patented medications that were being developed, but during this period, marijuana was very infrequently used in favor of opium and/or cocaine. It wasn’t until the 1920s that marijuana began to garner a stronger place in pop culture.

According to some, the rapid cultural significance of marijuana is partly responsible for inspiring Prohibition. Meanwhile, there are some who attribute the rise in recreational marijuana use in the United States to jazz musicians and people in show business, resulting in so-called “reefer songs” and marijuana clubs called “tea pads” being all the rage at the time. While bootlegging alcohol was a major offense at the time, authorities mostly disregarded the growing marijuana trend since users didn’t seem to be nuisances and because marijuana wasn’t actually an illegal substance.

Until the 1930s, marijuana was even prescribed for things like nausea and labor pains, but at this point the U.S. government launched a marketing campaign in which they portrayed marijuana as a dangerous narcotic, which rapidly changed public perceptions. With the Controlled Substances Act of 1970, marijuana was finally classified as a Schedule I substance, which is a designation that indicates the highest abuse potential with no accepted medical uses.

Since then, many studies have shown that marijuana is actually substantially less harmful than most other substances, including alcohol, which is legally available to those of appropriate age. The strongest argument that remains against marijuana is its designation as a “gateway drug”, which is still one of the most compelling reasons for the substance remaining illegal despite the fact that the same could (and has) been said about alcohol.

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EFFECTS OF MARIJUANA

As with many psychoactive substances, marijuana tends to affect people in different ways according to their state of mind, experience with mind-altering substances, and other factors. For instance, some individuals report that marijuana makes them extremely paranoid and fearful while others don’t experience this effect at all. However, some of the most consistent effects of marijuana are its depressant-like effects, including drowsiness, decrease in fine motor control, sense of strong physical and emotional relaxation, decreased sense of personal identity, poor perceptions of space and time, increased hunger, and other such effects. Of course, there are a number of potential long-term effects, too, including respiratory problems, impaired ability to complete complex tasks, decline in cognitive abilities, and possible transition to harder and more dangerous substances.

IS MARIJUANA WITHDRAWAL REAL?

There’s been intense debate as to whether or not marijuana is actually addictive. According to the evidence that’s available, the most likely scenario is that marijuana is not actually addictive in the same way that heroin, alcohol, and benzodiazepines are addictive; however, the use of marijuana is habit forming. This means that individuals can develop a marijuana use habit, resulting in physiological distress when they’re unable to use marijuana. For the most part, this distress would include mostly psychological rather than physical symptoms, including agitation, mood swings, anxiety, insomnia, inability to concentrate, and so on.

OVERCOMING ADDICTION TO MARIJUANA

It’s not easy to live in active addiction to marijuana. Use of the drug becomes the main focus of one’s life, inhibiting performance in virtually every other area. However, there are resources available to help individuals get their lives back. For marijuana addiction, individuals can choose from a variety of different treatment programs, including outpatient or inpatient. For the most part, the important thing is to participate in psychotherapy, group counseling, life skills treatment, and other therapies that will help a marijuana addict achieve long-lasting sobriety.

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Finding the right help for yourself or a loved one can be an overwhelming and stressful process. We can remove those stresses by helping you find the right rehabilitation facility. Call us now to start the road to recovery.

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Real Client Testimonials

  • Before coming to coastal I was hopeless, helpless, and my family wanted nothing to do with me. It wasn’t the first detox I’d ever been to, but it was the only one who showed me so much love and compassion. They gave me hope. It’s hard to put into words the amount of gratitude I have for this facility. The employees were my family when I had none. The staff went out of their way to make sure not only were my physical needs taken care of, but my emotional needs as well. From the first phone call prior to admission, to helping me set up continuing care, they never missed a beat. Even going as far as to help me with my legal issues via Zoom court. This isn’t just a detox, they are the family I never had. All of the techs, especially Karen, are phenomenal. They will take the time to listen to you, laugh, and cry(if needed) with you. If you are reading this and you or your loved one is suffering like I was, go to Coastal Detox. The level of care is more than I could ever put into a review. It wasn’t the first detox I’d been to, but it has been my last; I owe them everything I have today, including my life.

    Travis B Avatar
    Travis B.
    12/07/2020
  • Had a really good experience at Coastal. The staff really went above and beyond in helping me get in and gave me the respect l, space and care I needed after I first got there. As I started to fell better they encouraged me to take part in groups which helped get me out of my head and bring positivity and health to my thinking. They had a great massage therapist, who came daily and it was evident the nursing staff genuinely cared. Got to know some of the staff as well and I’m grateful for the cooks Joe and Chris. Those guys literally made us sirloins and pork chops for dinner. Also I gotta thank Chris and Chris for helping me get in and setting me up with a transition plan. Real grateful for that help, I’m not sure if it’s management intention to hire guys named Chris but they got a good thing going there. Overall, I’m clean and sober today and walking it out. Coastal gave me a base that set me up for the success that I’m walking in today

    Brandon B. Avatar
    Brandon B.
    1/16/2020
  • My family is very thankful for Coastal Detox. They have went above and beyond for my son a few times. Unfortunately he has needed their help more than once and they have ever turned their back on him, even when he was at his worst. Jeannie and Chris have been amazing and kept me informed through the entire process. They truly care about the addict and want to help them especially when it would be easy to give up on them. I had many detox facilities be rude and uncaring to me when I was searching for help for my son, but Coastal never did that to us. I don't know the names of all the team members that have helped my son but I know their are many and y'all are angels!! One day we will be able to pay it forward and help someone as you have helped us. Thank you for all you do!!

    Brenda A. Avatar
    Brenda A.
    1/01/2020
  • Can not say enough nice things about Coastal Detox & staff. Family member was there, told me five stars for the facility & all whom she interacted with. Said the facilities, ambience..., cleanliness, grounds, food, (think their chef is five stars), were all top shelf. All I interacted with personally & on the phone were patient, professional, responsive & caring. Kudos to so many: Jeannie Jones, Clinical Director whom I spent the most face to face time with: great oversight, patience & follow thru. Raquel Barker, Therapist was so understanding & on spot with her assessments/care. Kris Garrigus Admissions Director, another Coastal professional whom I cannot say enough nice things about, always so patient & responsive to my probably too frequent inquires. Not to be forgotten is Judy Tucker, Director of Operations she too so patiently "put up with me"
    I highly recommend Coastal Detox

    Susan C. Avatar
    Susan C.
    11/13/2019
  • Can not say enough nice things about Coastal Detox & staff. Family member was there, told me five stars for the facility & all whom she interacted with. Said the facilities, ambience..., cleanliness, grounds, food, (think their chef is five stars), were all top shelf. All I interacted with personally & on the phone were patient, professional, responsive & caring. Kudos to so many: Jeannie Jones, Clinical Director whom I spent the most face to face time with: great oversight, patience & follow thru. Raquel Barker, Therapist was so understanding & on spot with her assessments/care. Kris Garrigus Admissions Director, another Coastal professional whom I cannot say enough nice things about, always so patient & responsive to my probably too frequent inquires. Not to be forgotten is Judy Tucker, Director of Operations she too so patiently "put up with me"
    I highly recommend Coastal Detox

    Susan C. Avatar
    Susan C.
    11/06/2019

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