How Alcoholism Recovery Reinvents Your Life

alcohol detox

We all need something to run towards. Something to feel excited about and propel us forward in our lives. Alcohol detox can give you this purpose.

Running away from our past and our pain may be what leads to alcoholism in the first place. Changing our lives through alcoholism recovery can be scary, but also rewarding.

And, although it’s considered to be a positive change, some will still encounter challenges and difficult emotions. By reinventing our lives, however, we can give ourselves something to work towards. And, something to get excited about.

Recovery doesn’t need to be just about overcoming addictions. It can also be about giving ourselves the love and wonderful life we deserve. It’s about looking at our past choices, assessing them, and making changes.

Alcoholism recovery is about healing. And, even though it’s difficult to face our emotions, pasts, and addictions, reinventing ourselves makes it all worth it.

Want to know the best part? You never have to do it alone. Your fellow alcoholics-in-recovery can guide you along the way and help you to find your new truth.

Read on to learn more about how alcoholism recovery can reinvent your life.

Alcoholism Recovery: Discovering a New You

Alcoholism recovery won’t always be “rainbows and unicorns.” But you will learn how to deliberately create a more meaningful and fulfilling life. Explore the following ways you can reinvent your life during alcoholism recovery.

Millions of people around the world suffer from alcoholism.

1. New Coping Skills

You’ll learn new coping skills such as journaling, deeper breathing, and gaining support. You’ll learn more about people, places, and things to avoid, and what to do when you feel triggered. In alcoholism recovery, you can escape this vicious cycle.

For many alcoholics, drinking is a coping skill. Initially, alcohol may have provided you with relief from your emotions, feeling self-conscious, or painful memories. It may have also helped you to loosen up and enjoy yourself.

But, eventually, using alcohol as a coping skill can turn into an addiction. You start to drink even when you don’t want to. More and more problems pop up in your life, and then you use alcohol to cope with the problems it created in the first place.

You may also need to drink to avoid withdrawals. At this stage, your body is physically dependent on alcohol.

2. Change in Interests

If your addiction to alcohol was severe, it’s possible that you didn’t even consider having interests. Alcohol consumed and controlled your life to the point where it may have been your only interest. This is a very exhausting lifestyle to lead, but alcoholism recovery can offer you a new set of interests and hobbies.

In recovery, it’s beneficial to take some classes, volunteer, and discover or rediscover your hobbies. Take up a new sport or start a blog. Connect with what lights you up and allow yourself to explore.

3. Improved Physical Wellness

Alcoholism recovery also gives your body a chance to recover. It gives you the ability to add healthy habits into your life. You can eat more nutritious foods, workout, and drink more water.

Hangovers are physically, mentally, and emotionally painful. Our bodies feel achy, we may vomit, or have the shakes. Alcohol wreaks havoc on our bodies and can cause an assortment of health problems.

4. New Social Life

One part of alcoholism recovery is assessing your social life. If the people you interact with are still in active addiction or were one of your party friends, then it may be best to limit or eliminate time spent with them.

As a result, you’ll avoid triggers and make space for new friends. Your new social group can be others in recovery or people you meet while participating in new activities.

These people can provide you with a new perspective. They can also introduce you to new habits, mindsets, and other positive influences.

5. Improved Self-Esteem

Self-esteem is the belief in your own worth. In alcoholism recovery, you’ll learn that you’ve always been worthy of a positive and fulfilling life. And, when you begin to act out that truth, your self-esteem will improve.

We can take action to improve our self-esteem by practicing self-care, self-love, and doing what’s right.

6. Resilience

You’ve been through a lot in your life. Before and after active addiction, you may have encountered many painful experiences. Alcoholism recovery gives you a chance to become a survivor of these circumstances.

As a result of healing, developing new coping skills, and not drinking, you can also become more resilient to life’s challenges. You’ll learn how to think differently and what to do instead of taking a drink.

Forgiving yourself and others can also produce healing. However, part of recovering also involves grieving. You’ll grieve for the alcohol, your previous lifestyle, and the people, places, and things you leave behind.

This is completely normal. It is a part of reinventing yourself and allowing in new people and experiences.

7. New Set of Behaviors

When you begin alcohol recovery, your life may feel foreign. Everything is new and sometimes that feels overwhelming. You may wonder what to do on a Friday night or how to mow your lawn for the first time without having a drink.

What emerges is the chance to develop a new set of behaviors. For example, going to meetings, hanging out with sober people, and trying new things.

Other new behaviors that can come from recovery are learning how to make amends and how to become more mindful. You may also begin to pray and to lean on a higher power of your understanding.

Alcoholism Recovery: Gaining Support

Alcoholism recovery is difficult without the support of others. When learning a new way of life, we often need a mentor. This can come in the form of a therapist, sponsor, and/or fellow recovering alcoholics.

A rehab program can also give you the support you need in early alcoholism recovery. Additionally, some of these rehab programs offer medical detox programs.

Before you begin alcoholism recovery and quit drinking, you should always consult with a medical professional.

Are you interested in taking control of your life and going to a rehab facility in Florida?

Contact us today by calling 877-406-6623 to begin your recovery journey and the process of reinventing yourself.

 

Content Reviewed by Jacklyn Steward

Jacklyn StewardJacklyn is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) and an EMDR trained trauma therapy specialist with over 6 years of experience in the field of addiction. She has a Masters Degree in Mental Health and Substance Abuse Counseling from Nova Southeastern University.