How to Accept You Have a Problem with Addiction

Imagine yourself standing on the sidewalk on a breezy summer day observing nature and the wonders of life fluttering around you. The birds are chirping, nature is humming, and life is just glorious on this very day. Walking down the sidewalk whistling a tune, you watch a man face deep in his phone prepare to stroll across the street- only he doesn’t look left and right like somebody’s mother should have taught him.

As he slowly jay walks those first couple steps off the protected cement sidelines, you notice a bus flooring it in his direction. He finally looks up and sees said metal contraption speeding his way. Now he can do one of two things: he can either admit the bus is heading for him and consider all ramifications and everything about it, or he can accept the bus is heading for him and take action to not get plowed over by the city automobile.

This analogy works remarkably when it comes to the idea of accepting addiction. You see, the thing is admitting is to kind of acknowledge something where accepting is more about taking action. It’s almost like the difference between being passive or assertive in a sense. Accepting addiction problems is never an easy thing- but it takes action to avoid getting the tire marks of alcoholism skid across your face.          

Is Ignorance Really Bliss?

In a lot of ways, admitting is kind of synonymous with justification. To admit we have a problem with addiction or alcoholism is kind of overlooking it. A lot of chemically dependent friends tend to use this as an instrument for rationalizing their unjust behaviors, “Of course I relapsed- I’m an addict/alcoholic”. It’s like we kind of play dumb with ourselves when in our deepest of hearts we know there is something problematic going on here. Deflection is second nature to an addict in denial- always. When we are really accepting addiction, we use the tool of solution to move on from a problem that is (re)occurring. In this case, ignorance will get you killed.

Accepting addiction and the tribulations of life zipping our way takes a lot of self-awareness and maturity-  to say the least. Really accepting addiction and dealing with it can require

  • Detoxification
  • Therapy
  • A 12 Step Program
  • Healthy Exercise and Nutrition Habits
  • Prayer/Meditation
  • Accepting Help from Others

Of all the tools we develop throughout this short lifespan or ours, acceptance is one of the greatest. Acceptance applies in innumerable ways to life and the future lessons at hand. The serenity prayer should really be a mantra to more than just addicts and alcoholics.

Every day there are going to be things that happen to us that are out of our control- but the butterfly effect that follows is contingent upon our reactions. When things are working out in our favor we aren’t thinking about acceptance but just taking everything as it is. We don’t question the superior things that happen to us as often as we do the negative trials weighing us down. Accepting addiction is the toughest pill to swallow. Nobody wakes excited to be a recovering addict or alcoholic, but it isn’t a death sentence if we can really accept it.

man thinking

Denial River

Often times people have speculation of themselves or a loved one struggling but are in denial about it. For one, a large percentage of the human population has a misconception of what a drug addict or alcoholic actually looks like. In turn, most are caught off guard when somebody close begins the struggle and they’re not the random bearded junkie we expect to be living under a bridge. It can be the well-dressed business man, the soccer mom, or little Tina across the street that babysits the children every now and then. Anybody of any age, race, gender, sex, religion or creed can find themselves face to face dealing with and hopefully accepting addiction.

When the facts are laid out in front of our very own eyes, it can be a little harder to deny there is a problem. Is the drug/alcohol use affecting my health? Am I missing school, work, or other imperative appointment matters because of it? Is it causing stress or relieving it? Does the idea of being without substances worry me? These are all thoughts to take into account when facing the reality of one’s situation. Denying crucial matters like this can be our downfall. In a sense, when we constantly deny, all we are doing is lying to ourselves in some form or another. Call it justifications, minimizing, rationalizing- it doesn’t matter. In the end, were pretending something isn’t true or fact usually because it makes us uncomfortable in a sense. It’s our minds trying to protect us subconsciously but in the long run were only making things worse for ourselves by living in a false reality. The truth in accepting addiction is where we separate reality and imagination.

This Isn’t Hide and Seek

You can’t hide from the monster if you are the monster. Acceptance is one thing but this is acceptance of a problem with addiction. This acceptance brings us back to the beginning statement of trying to look at a harsh reality we aren’t very fond of. Indeed addiction is a tale of misfortune, but the power lies solely within the perpetrator. Human beings are the products of our own decisions and can pick and choose are misfortunes and joys as time unravels.

Accepting addiction and that there is a problem is best done sooner than later. Deciding there is a problem and being ready to do something about it shows an open minded willingness for change. Being open to change and all of “the new” is a great way of procuring acceptance in your life. Once the mind is opened to “what is”, the possibilities of “what can be” open up tenfold. Trying a new outlook on things might be the key instrument in your decision between admitting and accepting.  

The Sign of Times

Having to accept something you don’t like can put anybody’s feathers in a ruffle. Addiction and alcoholism don’t give you a choice. They force you to take the facts as they come and there isn’t a pause button to this movie. If you or your loved one is ready to leave substance dependency behind and start this way of life, please call 888-481-1993 or visit www.coastaldetox.com. Our teams of specialists are waiting by to help figure out what options are best for sending your life is a comfortable direction that you can proudly stand behind.

Real Client Testimonials

  • Before coming to coastal I was hopeless, helpless, and my family wanted nothing to do with me. It wasn’t the first detox I’d ever been to, but it was the only one who showed me so much love and compassion. They gave me hope. It’s hard to put into words the amount of gratitude I have for this facility. The employees were my family when I had none. The staff went out of their way to make sure not only were my physical needs taken care of, but my emotional needs as well. From the first phone call prior to admission, to helping me set up continuing care, they never missed a beat. Even going as far as to help me with my legal issues via Zoom court. This isn’t just a detox, they are the family I never had. All of the techs, especially Karen, are phenomenal. They will take the time to listen to you, laugh, and cry(if needed) with you. If you are reading this and you or your loved one is suffering like I was, go to Coastal Detox. The level of care is more than I could ever put into a review. It wasn’t the first detox I’d been to, but it has been my last; I owe them everything I have today, including my life.

    Travis B Avatar
    Travis B.
    12/07/2020
  • Had a really good experience at Coastal. The staff really went above and beyond in helping me get in and gave me the respect l, space and care I needed after I first got there. As I started to fell better they encouraged me to take part in groups which helped get me out of my head and bring positivity and health to my thinking. They had a great massage therapist, who came daily and it was evident the nursing staff genuinely cared. Got to know some of the staff as well and I’m grateful for the cooks Joe and Chris. Those guys literally made us sirloins and pork chops for dinner. Also I gotta thank Chris and Chris for helping me get in and setting me up with a transition plan. Real grateful for that help, I’m not sure if it’s management intention to hire guys named Chris but they got a good thing going there. Overall, I’m clean and sober today and walking it out. Coastal gave me a base that set me up for the success that I’m walking in today

    Brandon B. Avatar
    Brandon B.
    1/16/2020
  • My family is very thankful for Coastal Detox. They have went above and beyond for my son a few times. Unfortunately he has needed their help more than once and they have ever turned their back on him, even when he was at his worst. Jeannie and Chris have been amazing and kept me informed through the entire process. They truly care about the addict and want to help them especially when it would be easy to give up on them. I had many detox facilities be rude and uncaring to me when I was searching for help for my son, but Coastal never did that to us. I don't know the names of all the team members that have helped my son but I know their are many and y'all are angels!! One day we will be able to pay it forward and help someone as you have helped us. Thank you for all you do!!

    Brenda A. Avatar
    Brenda A.
    1/01/2020
  • Can not say enough nice things about Coastal Detox & staff. Family member was there, told me five stars for the facility & all whom she interacted with. Said the facilities, ambience..., cleanliness, grounds, food, (think their chef is five stars), were all top shelf. All I interacted with personally & on the phone were patient, professional, responsive & caring. Kudos to so many: Jeannie Jones, Clinical Director whom I spent the most face to face time with: great oversight, patience & follow thru. Raquel Barker, Therapist was so understanding & on spot with her assessments/care. Kris Garrigus Admissions Director, another Coastal professional whom I cannot say enough nice things about, always so patient & responsive to my probably too frequent inquires. Not to be forgotten is Judy Tucker, Director of Operations she too so patiently "put up with me"
    I highly recommend Coastal Detox

    Susan C. Avatar
    Susan C.
    11/13/2019
  • Can not say enough nice things about Coastal Detox & staff. Family member was there, told me five stars for the facility & all whom she interacted with. Said the facilities, ambience..., cleanliness, grounds, food, (think their chef is five stars), were all top shelf. All I interacted with personally & on the phone were patient, professional, responsive & caring. Kudos to so many: Jeannie Jones, Clinical Director whom I spent the most face to face time with: great oversight, patience & follow thru. Raquel Barker, Therapist was so understanding & on spot with her assessments/care. Kris Garrigus Admissions Director, another Coastal professional whom I cannot say enough nice things about, always so patient & responsive to my probably too frequent inquires. Not to be forgotten is Judy Tucker, Director of Operations she too so patiently "put up with me"
    I highly recommend Coastal Detox

    Susan C. Avatar
    Susan C.
    11/06/2019

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